Cass Creek’s Nomad Wild Boar Call Brings in the Bacon

14 12 2013

cass-creek-logoCass Creek Outdoors makes one of the few wild boar calls I have been able to find. Their Nomad Wild Boar Call with Moving Sound Remote gives you a wide selection of hog calls designed to help you bring home the bacon!!

cass creek hog call

Set up of the Nomad Wild Boar Call is easy.
Photo: Cass Creek

I set the receiver up near our hunting condo, aka blind. There are no wires to the call, and the receiver is very light to carry into the fields.I attached a lanyard to the remote so I would not have to search for it, while the speaker/receiver can be clipped onto your pack or belt.

You are able to control up to 3 receivers from the one remote, which will make the sounds as if they are moving toward or away from you area. The system has 5 calls you can chose from: Feeding Frenzy, Contented Feeding, Social Grunts, Fighting, and Feeding Piglets. My favorite combination was the Social Grunts coupled with the Feeding Piglets. I have heard the same grunts and squeals when we have stalked up onto a feeding group of hogs. 

I started calling just shortly before dark, and it didn’t take long before we were seeing results. The various series of calls sound very realistic, and the volume control adjust in a clear concise sound. There was a lone boar cautiously making its way into our clearing. I made short work of the hog and quickly got set up again. I had a reddish sow come back in before long, and she also rode home with us.

turkey hunt 004

The Cass Creek Nomad Wild Boar Call was used to call this sow in.
Photo: Diane Hassinger

Remember to check with your local regulations before using an electronic call, as they are not permitted in some areas. Where they are legal, these will be a huge advantage to filling your tags.

The Nomad Wild Boar Call is available for purchase at http://www.casscreek.com/Cass-Creek-Nomad-Wild-Boar-Electronic-Game-Call, Amazon.com, Bass Pro Shops, Cabelas, various other sporting goods shops or at http://www.casscreek.com. The MSRP is $79.99. They also offer these calls in Predator, and Moose.

Cass Creek Logo is the sole property of it’s rightful owner and used within this writing solely for the promotion of products herein as requested by the product’s manufacturer.

Endorsement Disclosure: Per the guidelines of the Federal Trade Commission, the products reviewed in these product reviews is an endorsement and the writer may have been compensated by “in-kind” payment to review the product.

This post was originally published at http://ladiesincamo.com/licpr/2013/10/28/cass-creeks-nomad-wild-boar-call-brings-in-the-bacon-diane-hassinger/

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Cass Creek Nomad Wild Boar Electronic Game Call

7 03 2013

This product review originally published on http://ladiesincamo.com/licpr/2013/03/06/cass-creek-nomad-wild-boar-electronic-game-calldiane/

Cass Creek Outdoors makes one of the few wild boar calls I have been able to find.  Their Nomad Wild Boar Call with Moving Sound Remote gives you a wide selection of hog calls designed to help you bring home the bacon!!

cass creek hog callI

was hunting hogs in Alabama, and had a lot of opportunity to try out this unique call.  We set the receiver up near our position.  There are no wires, and the receiver is very light to carry into the fields. I attached a lanyard to the remote so I would not have to search for it, while the speaker/receiver can be clipped onto your pack or belt.  For this hunt, I attached the receiver to a young sapling about 20 yards from our shooting house.  There is a swamp immediately behind, and woods on all sides, a green field is also nearby, an ideal set up to start with!

turkey hunt 004

We started calling just after lunch, and it didn’t take long before we were seeing results.  The various series of calls sound very realistic, and the volume control adjusted in a clear concise sound. I played with the volume control to make it sound like the pigs were moving away from the area, and then in reverse of that to make it appear they were coming closer.  Many other times I had wild hogs grunting or squealing in response just following my playing one of the calls.  I was also able to utilize this call when I was stalking hogs.  I clipped it right onto my binocular strap, and played the calls periodically while I was walking, using it as you would a hand held call. There is also the ability to set up 3 receivers with one Transmitter Remote Control.  This makes it possible to not only direct the hogs into a better position or make it sound like it is true moving sound.

There are 5 distinct series of calls programmed into the receiver;

  1.  Feeding Frenzy – Excited grunts and squeals as hogs greedily compete to feed.
  2. Contented Feeding – Sounds of feeding hogs at newly located food source which draws others to join.
  3. Social Grunts – individual hogs communicate greetings within the herd.
  4. Fighting Boar – Aggressive rival males battling for herd dominance.
  5. Feeding Piglets – Confident sow grunts and feeding piglets signal safety, luring in hogs from dense cover.

My favorite combination was the Social Grunts with the Contented Feeding.  I have been in situations where the wild hogs that I was near, used grunts and squeals that sounded very similar to this.  I also used the Feeding Piglets as a stand alone call, since I have witnessed the larger hogs eating in relative quiet, while the young piglets are making lots of, well, pig noises!

I will be using my Nomad Wild Boar Call on many hunts coming up, and I will keep you updated on my results!

The Nomad Wild Boar Call is available for purchase at Amazon.com, Bass Pro Shops, Cabelas, various other sporting goods shops or at www.casscreek.com. The MSRP is $79.99. They also offer these calls in Predator, and Moose.

Stock Photo Credit:  Cass Creek

Photo Credit:  Diane Hassinger





Hog Hunting Basics

25 04 2012

Originally posted on Ladies in Camo Articles.  http://ladiesincamo.com/hoghuntingbasics.html

Since Ladies in Camo is giving away a 4 day hog hunt to one very lucky person, I thought a few basics on hog hunting would be in order.

Feral pigs are known by many different names; wild hogs, wild boars, Russian boars or even razor backs.  They are hooved animals that range in size from 75 pounds to a high of around 440 pounds for a large boar.  They look a lot like the domestic pig, only with longer coarser hair, with the adults sporting a mane that has thick coarse bristles.  They range in color from the blacks, grays, reds, browns, to pale tans.  They may also have belting or spotting in these colors.  Black is the predominate color.  Their snouts, which are long, flexible and rugged, are used for the never ending rooting.  They will eat most anything they come in contact with, which can include any type of grains, nuts, acorns, roots, mushrooms and even dead animals.  Their feet are cloven, similar to a deer’s hooves, but more rounded and flat tipped. The boars can have tusks that can be 3 to 5 inches in length.  They use these to establish dominance, and because of this, they have developed a shield comprised of cartilage, scar tissue and callus which becomes thicker and stronger as they age.

Piglets of all colors

Feral hogs have a very keen sense of smell, and a good sense of hearing.  Their eyesight is thought to be poor and nearsighted.  They are quick runners and swimmers, able to run up to 30 mph.

The sows can breed as young as 6 months of age, with gestation of around 115 days.  They can have litters ranging from 4 to 12 piglets each time.  Estimates are that a single sow can produce over 1000 offspring in a 5 year period.  That in itself is how hog populations can quickly get out of control, and can cause serious damage to crops and vegetation.

In Alabama you will need a small game hunting license to hunt for hogs.  These licenses can be bought for a few day hunt or for the entire year.  While you do not need to have the license displayed, you must have it on yourself, and have identification with you.  Licensed hunters can shoot pigs year round and there is no bag limit on the hogs.  You can purchase your license online at  https://www.alabamainteractive.org/dcnr_hf_license/welcome.action.

Hogs often will appear in food plots, hardwood bottoms, or pine woods.  You can determine when they have been in an area based on the rooting that may cover a large area.  I have been in areas that resemble a rototilled garden, the rooting was that extensive.  You may also see trees that the hogs have been rubbing on to scratch an itch, remove the dried mud or even parasites from their skin.  These trees may have mud several foot up the trunk, and there may be pieces of hair stuck in the bark.  Wallows will be present in wet soils, basically an indentation holding mud or water.  Feral hogs feed most heavily in the early morning and late evening, spending the rest of their time sleeping or relaxing in their mud wallows.  Since wild hogs do not have sweat glands they use the wallows to cool down and to also rid themselves of fleas or ticks.  You may even be able to smell a sweetness like maple syrup when you are near a group of hogs.  Keep in mind the hogs frequent some of the same areas as cottonmouth, rattlesnake and copper head snakes.  You will probably want snake chaps or boots to protect yourself.

The hunting of wild hogs is done several ways; tree stands, blinds, still hunting, with dogs or spot and stalk.  Most all weapons have been used to take hogs, from bowie knives to high power rifles.  Typically compound bows, cross bows and rifles are the weapons of choice.  Feral hogs tend not to be aggressive toward hunters, but they will charge if they are cornered, injured or if their young are threatened.

From the tree stands and blinds, you will need patience.  The stands are typically positioned to ambush the hogs either on their way to or from food plots, bedding areas or water.  This method is the most common, and great success can be had hunting this way.  I recently had 15 hogs around the tree stand I was in.  I was able to take my time, pick the hog I wanted, and make a great shot.  You also will have the advantage of being up high enough to see where your hog goes after he is shot.

Spot and stalk is done on foot, going to where hogs are known to frequent.  While stalking, you can get away with rustling leaves, but try to refrain from snapping twigs and branches.  You can usually hear hogs squealing and grunting from 40 yards away or more.   If you walk slowly, stop and listen often, and keep the wind in your favor; you may be able to get within shooting range.  Do not expect the hogs to stand still for you though,  they are in a constant state of motion.  Recently 4 of us stalked to within 20 yards of a herd of hogs, and watched for several moments, undetected.  Only one good shot was presented and taken.

Still hunting involves the slow deliberate movements, looking for tracks, listening for sounds, watching for signs.  The accepted method of still hunting covers a mere 100 yards in an hour.

Once you have located your hogs, shot placement is of the utmost importance.  Like any animal, hogs will perish quickly with a well-placed shot.  Their thick hides, shields and thick fat create a tough barrier for broad heads or bullets.  A broadside shot should be placed in the shoulder area, lower is preferred.  A broken shoulder will put the hog down, and give you time for a follow up shot if needed.  When quartering away, place the shot to penetrate the vitals between the shoulders.  A neck shot works well for a rifle.  Some employ the head shot, but if you are not confident of this shot, go for one of the larger body targets.  If you are hunting for meat, take a smaller hog or two.  The larger boars, while impressive, are tougher and less tasty.

I tracked a group of hogs that easily numbered around 100, in every size imaginable.  They were making enough noise to cover any sound I was making.  I had several groups on 3 sides of me; this was a pure adrenaline rush!   Don’t let yourself become distracted by the numbers of hogs, still shoot at a spot on one hog, not just at a group of them.

Shot Placement on Hogs

Yearly, feral hogs do nearly $90 million in damage to crops in Alabama alone, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. This problem isn’t just isolated to Alabama. Feral pigs are in 44 states and at least 4 of the Canadian provinces.  They do about $1.5 billion in damage to farm crops nationally each year.  This is all the encouragement I need to hunt hogs as often as possible!  Whether you are in a tree stand or on the ground, there is nothing quite like hog hunting.  Watch out though, it becomes an addiction!

Shot Placement Image;  http://www.texashuntfish.com/app/view/Post/10379/Shot-placement-on-hogs





Rack Nine Outdoors

7 02 2012

Diane's 8 point buck

This is a reprint from a blog that originally appeared in “Shenanigans from the field”.

I happened to see a post on Shenanigans from the Field about a Ladies in CamoLadies Only Hunt at Rack Nine Outdoors in Clio, Alabama.  What caught my eye was that it was a buck, doe, coyote, hog and bobcat hunt.  This was just too much to ask for.  I had found this post only 2 ½ weeks prior to the hunt, so a lot had to fall into place for this to happen.  I am a firm believer in fate and it would work out if it was meant to be.  Well things fell into place perfectly and on December 7th I flew into Montgomery Airport to catch a ride with Richard and Nancy to the camp.

Pulling into the camp I immediately felt at ease and knew this had been a good choice.  The lodge felt like home, and the few huntresses and guides that were there felt like family from the start. While everyone pigged out on pizza, we made our plans for morning.  There would be 3 of us hunting, while the rest were to come in staggered over the next 2 days.  Four a.m. came early the next morning, with temperatures below freezing, and having not brought all of my cold weather gear, freezing is what I did too!   Terry put me in a tree stand overlooking a food plot.  It wasn’t long before the show began and I forgot all about being cold.  I had a nice 8 point bucks  with 2 girlfriends come thru, just pausing long enough for me to know I could not get a shot off at him.  What a tease!  Shortly after that another 8 point entered my view, and took his good old time about entering the food plot.  He was joined by 2 spike buck that entertained me for almost an hour with their sparring and play.  Meanwhile my 8 point was raking the trees nearby and making a scrape right in front of me.  After 15 minutes of wonderful memories, I decided that if I would shoot this guy on the last day, the first day was a good day too.  Almost right on cue the buck turned broadside then quartered away just slightly.

As I pulled the trigger, I was thankful I was able to be here at this time.  You see 2 ½ years ago I was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer, and underwent a bilateral mastectomy.  They also removed some lymph nodes to check for the spread of cancer.  Following my surgery, no one could answer whether I would ever be able to fish, bow hunt, or shoot shotguns and rifles again.   No one had ever asked these questions of my doctors, I was the first!  Well I am delighted to prove to everyone, that not only is it possible, but you can still be successful as well!

My buck tucked his tail and hunched up telling me I had hit him good.  I sent a text to Terry and continued watching the two spikes play.  They never even flinched when I shot, and I videotaped them for the next 15 minutes.  Unreal!  In Pennsylvania I would have chased off every deer for a half mile with that one shot.  When Terry and Doug arrived, we started looking for a blood trail, and panic started to set in.  I knew I had hit him good, but there was no blood to speak of.  We finally found 1 drop 10-15 feet from where he was shot and then 1 drop at a time, at 5-10 feet intervals, for about 70 yards.  I was just about heartbroken when Doug said “there he is”.  He had only gone 75 yards and was piled up under a pine tree.  He was nice high 8 point, and I was thrilled.

The next evening I was placed in a ground blind, in a tract of woods near a food plot.  Both Terry and Doug had said to feel free to spot and stalk hogs, so that was my goal.  Coyotes were howling nearby as I slowly hiked about ¼ mile down a logging trail from the blind.  Before long it sounded like a football team racing thru the woods.  Slowly and quietly I inched into a position to see the hogs.  It did not take long to find a big sow, and with a lot of luck she walked into the one sight window that I had that was big enough to shoot thru, about the size of a coffee can.  Holding my breath I took the 75 yard shot, and was rewarded with watching her drop not 3 feet from where I shot her.  I continued to look for my next shooter, but this group turned tail and ran.  After texting Terry that I had a hog down, and that I was going to continue looking for her friends, I marked her location and started tracking the whole herd.  It did not take long to locate them across the logging road.  I had to go into the cramped quarters of the paper mills pine forest.  At one point I had 3 groups pretty much surrounding me, easily 100 wild pigs, all squealing and rooting and paying no attention to me at all.  As much as I tried to, I could not down another pig, but what a rush to have that many wild pigs around you!

I am already planning my next trip to Rack Nine with my husband this time.  I hope he gets to experience situations like I had here.  And I will be excited to be here to share it with him.  I am proud to not only say I am a cancer survivor, but I am enjoying life!  Everyone should get out and do what they love every opportunity they can.  “Love the Life you Live, Live the Life you Love” (Bob Marley)