The Best Buddy for a Crossbow; The XBow Buddy Sling

14 12 2013

stringsling

crossbow buddy

The X-Bow Buddy Sling by H & M Archery
Photo: Cass Creek

If you hunt with a crossbow, you probably love hunting with it, but wish there was an easier way to carry it to the stand or during a spot and stalk situation. X-Bow Buddy Sling by H & M Archery takes care of that problem.

cross bow buddy sling

The X-Bow Buddy Sling installed on a TenPoint Crossbow Photo: Diane Hassinger

The X-Bow Buddy Sling allows you to hold your bow in the ready position rather than on your back. The unique design works whether you are walking, standing or even sitting in a stand or blind. This enables you to use your hands freely, while doing away with any fear of your crossbow falling. The weight of the crossbow is also transferred to your shoulder rather than your arms, leaving your arms fresh when the shot opportunity comes.

The X-Bow Buddy Sling has a tubular fiberglass rod covered in nylon webbing strap that is attached to a metal rod installed on a bracket on the foot stirrup. The strap is elevated above the front of your crossbow high enough for it to clear the scope, and conveniently stays out-of-the-way of your shot. The assembly is very simple, you just need a wrench to tighten 4 nuts, adjust the strap to your shoulder and you are ready to go. The strap is removable for storage and travel in a case by loosening one knurled nut. The entire unit easily converts to a conventional over the back strap. The sling fits most crossbows on the market including TenPoint, Horton, Excalibur, Barnett, Parker, and Darton.

dianes 200 pound doe

The X-Bow Buddy kept my crossbow at the ready when this 200 pound doe came in.
Photo: Diane Hassinger

I have been using the X-Cross Bow Buddy Sling throughout the archery seasons in various states this year. During my Spring black bear hunt, I spent 4 days riding on the back of an ATV in and out of the timber. The sling made it easy to keep my crossbow safe, while being able to hang onto the quad. In the tree stands, I was able to sit comfortably with my crossbow cradled by the sling, leaving me free to film and take pictures of the many bear antics I witnessed. Traversing the hilly terrain to my deer stands was effortless, I was able to manage the crossbow and still have my hands free to use my flashlight and carry my other equipment.

The X-Bow Buddy Sling can be purchased at http://www.stringsling.com, various online retailers and in some sporting goods stores. For a low MSRP price of $39.99, you will wonder why you didn’t have one on your crossbow sooner! I personally hope to be stalking hogs soon using my crossbow and X-Bow Buddy.

H & M Archery/String Sling Logo is the sole property of it’s rightful owner and used within this writing solely for the promotion of products herein as requested by the product’s manufacturer.

Endorsement Disclosure: Per the guidelines of the Federal Trade Commission, the products reviewed in these product reviews is an endorsement and the writer may have been compensated by “in-kind” payment to review the product.

This post was originally published at http://ladiesincamo.com/licpr/2013/12/03/the-best-buddy-for-a-crossbow-diane-hassinger/





Bullseye Camera System-See Your Shot

11 10 2013

bullseye camera system logo

If you are anything like me, sighting in your rifle includes multiple, time-consuming trips back and forth to the target. This isn’t a problem when you are working with 20, 50 or even a hundred yards; yardages beyond that, I would often times use a quad to run back and forth. No more! I will be using the Bullseye Camera System; unique system that accurately reflects your shot on the actual target emitting a photo of the target to a program on your computer right from the place you executed the shot…in a matter of mere seconds.

Bullseye Camera Systems, LLC offers 2 different models to help you see the shot you take. I field tested the 1000-yard camera system recently which includes a weatherproof camera with night vision, two 5-hour rechargeable battery packs, router, antenna, tripod, connectors, carrying case and the Bullseye Target Manager Software. The Bullseye Target Manager Software is compatible with Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 or 8.

Setting up the system is quick and easy. The camera is set-up on the tripod near and facing the intended target. The kit contains 2 rechargeable battery packs; one to power the camera and the other to power the wireless router. A couple of cords finishes off the physical set-up of the system at the target. The software will need to be loaded onto a laptop from the supplied flash drive containing the entire program. Once the software is executed you can define your target and then go into the shooting mode.

shooting reviews 109

Here is the system set up and ready to work near the target. Photo: Diane Hassinger

Now the fun begins! Once you shoot, simply press the space bar, and the picture will be transmitted to your lap top. You can easily see right where you hit the target. Mark the shot and then shoot again–that is it! You have the ability to keep track of your efforts and you can even note the shooter, the target range, caliber of weapon and ammo used. This system also works with shotguns and bows. You could even have fun with it with pies in a face if you so desired—just kidding, but it would work.

bullseye camera system gnome marked

We had some fun with these evil trolls! This is an actual screen print from the computer. Photo: Diane Hassinger

We recently hosted a retired Veterans’ hunt in Alabama where the attendees were able to shoot an M-1 Garand/50 Caliber Barrett. We shot at 600-yards and I cannot tell you how much effort this system saved. We still doubled-checked some shots by riding a motorized vehicle out to the target.That wasn’t necessary because what the computer showed was accurate in revealing what the target reflected.

It was extremely easy to note the size difference of the various calibers used on the targets by what was revealed on the computer screen. There were well over 500 rounds shot, which this system not only saved us from a lot of time consuming trips back and forth to the target, but we also had the proof and a lot of pictures to show the accuracy of each shooter’s shots.

As I prepared for my South African trip, shooting at 100-yards, the Bullseye Camera System made the most fun I have ever had while “working”. The really nice part is that I had solid corroboration of my shot placement which to me is important to be confident with my shooting ability.

Ladies in Camo recently hosted an Archery Day with Chris Brackett where the Bullseye Camera System was used in an 82-yard shooting contest. We also used it with a foam disc thrower which Chris Brackett brought. The system caught some amazing shots. Before long, everyone was putting faith in what I was seeing on the computer and I was instantly able to show them exactly where they hit the target.

bullseye long distance arrow shoot 2

The long distance shoot at the zombie. This system made it easy to declare the winner! Photo: Bullseye Camera System at Archery Day

bullseye arrow hit

An impressive archery shot connecting with a flying disc caught accurately on the Bullseye Camera System. Photo: Bullseye Camera System at Archery Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1000-yard Edition Bullseye Camera System is available for purchase at https://www.bullseyecamera.com/purchase.html.  With a MSRP of $549.00, the system is an affordable and fun way to practice your perfect shots where you can actually “see your shot” instantly and save time at the range. Bullseye Camera Systems, LLC also offers a 500-yard Edition at the MSRP of $449. Soon there will be smart phone app available making it even easier to see your shot instantly.

Bullseye Camera System. LLC Logo is the sole property of it’s rightful owner and used within this writing solely for the promotion of products herein as requested by the product’s manufacturer.

Endorsement Disclosure: Per the guidelines of the Federal Trade Commission, the products reviewed in these product reviews is an endorsement and the writer may have been compensated by “in-kind” payment to review the product.

This post was originally published on Ladies in Camo’s website at http://ladiesincamo.com/licpr/2013/09/22/see-your-shot-with-bullseye-camera-system-diane-hassinger/





My First Big Game Animal-How I got started hunting.

10 10 2013

This post originally appeared on Ladies in Camo website at http://ladiesincamo.com/lictoth/2013/05/04/diane-hassinger-my-first-big-game-animal/

Life is not fair!  Or at least that is how it seems to a twelve year old.  Add to that wanting to hunt and fish when neither of your parents enjoys either.  Add to that being a girl in 1972.

I wanted to hunt so badly, I would check out every magazine and book on hunting I could find at our local library.  Outdoor Life and Field and Stream became my educators.  I asked so many dumb questions of anyone who even vaguely knew anything about hunting.  I spent hours weekly riding the deer trails on our horses, observing the patterns of the deer.  I could ride right into a group of deer without them taking too much notice.

It seemed like divine intervention when my friend Cheryl talked her father into taking us for our Hunter Safety Certification.  We had about 30 participants in the course; 28 boys, me and Cheryl.  We took a lot of ribbing from the boys, and even a few of the fathers.  They felt we had no place in a “boys” class.  We didn’t mind, or at least didn’t let on to anyone that it bothered us.  Cheryl’s dad, having 6 daughters, was very supportive of girls being able to hunt.  His support made a huge difference in the tender sensibilities of a teenage girl.  By the end of the course, only 2 students rated a 100% on the test; me and Cheryl.  Instead of the boys being happy for us, they made sure we knew that hunting was a male sport.

I spent my teenage years fishing, hunting small game, riding horses, and high school sports.  I didn’t have the opportunity to do a big game hunt (anything bigger than a turkey) until I married Dale in 1979.  Both of us hunted to feed our growing family, and after the kids got big enough they joined with us.

My first BIG game hunt was for Elk of all things.  I had always enjoyed shooting my bow, but lacked the courage to try to hunt with it.  Finally I gave in to my need to go further with hunting and scheduled a hunt.  To say I was scared is an understatement.  I had studied shot placement till everyone was sick of listening to me question them.  I was shooting my bow hundreds of times a day to build up to a higher poundage.  I have the need to over study and research anything I am doing.  I guess that is my OCD.

Finally the day arrived and we took off on this next chapter of my life.  Dale was and still remains very supportive of me.  So I needed to do this not only for me, but to prove to him his support was not wasted.

I remember climbing into the “tree stand”, which was an old pallet nailed into a Y of a tree.  I had to watch where I placed my feet, for fear of slipping through the slats.  When I think of this now, I have to wonder “What the heck was I thinking!” No harness (no one wore them then), no pull up ropes, you toted everything up on your back, no cell phone, radio or gps (GASP!).  My tree stand was on a well-worn trail on the side of a steep embankment.  I tried to listen to every little noise, and kept glassing, looking for any sign of movement.  I did have a range finder with me, and had ranged several trees and rocks in hopes that I could use them as a range indicator.

Suddenly I hear what sounded like a stampede.  There were several cow elk and a 4X4 bull elk coming into range-fast!  I drew my bow and waited for the 4X4 to get close enough, and shot!  He turned tail and ran back down the hillside.  My guide who was a short distance away, heard the commotion, and headed over to me.  I still don’t know how I got down that rickety wood ladder; my knees were shaking something terrible.

We waited a short while, all the time my guide was asking was it a good shot.  HUH??  I think so, I don’t know, I was so nervous I couldn’t even remember.  Finally he gave up trying to get any useful information out of me, and we started after my bull.  We found him about 60 yards below my stand.  However he was still on his feet, although he was swaying back and forth.  The guide said to stick him again when I had a shot.  I told him I could shoot now.  He said “no you can’t”.  I said I could and released the arrow.  My shot was perfect!  He dropped instantly, of course rolling further down the hill.  “I can’t believe you made that shot” to which I replied “I told you I could”.

diane elk

The bad part of all this was that my elk was now at the very bottom of a very steep incline, and the truck was at the top.  By the time we had it loaded onto the truck, I was exhausted, but still exhilarated!  Later when we butchered the elk, we found that my first shot clipped the heart.  He was dying, just didn’t know it yet.  The second shot was right through the heart and 1 lung.

My 4X4 was mounted and hangs on our living room wall.  He is not a trophy to a lot of hunters, but he is a trophy in the true sense to me.  He was a big part of my confidence in my hunting abilities to be able to go on any hunt that catches my attention.

To this day I feel the pressure to prove myself capable, to prove my abilities, to compete with ghosts of my past.  Now I know I am up to the challenge!

Photo Credit:  Diane Hassinger

Excerpts from Huntingmotherearth.com in Hunter Safety Course 1972  https://huntingmotherearth.com/2012/03/15/hunter-safety-course-1972/





My Meatloaf Deer

24 04 2012

During the archery season of 2008, I managed to tag along with my husband and his friend Dan on their guy time hunt.  We all were wanting to fill some of our tags.  They both like to spot and stalk, while I am less comfortable doing that with a bow.  Dan shot an 8 point buck at 15 yards, that had worked his way around an oil tank. He also shot a doe at a nearby creek, as she made her way down to drink.  I finally convinced them to let me sit in a stand, so we picked one on the backside of Dan’s property.  I could hear the deer making their way toward me.  Mostly quiet, but the occasional shuffle of leaves.  Finally 3 deer, 1 small buck and 2 doe came into my view.  I was going to shoot the big doe, and drew back my bow, when I noticed the button buck was missing half of his front shoulder.  At that point, I changed position and sent my arrow into the button buck.  He ran a few yards, and dropped.  When I went down to him, you could tell someone had shot him during muzzle-loader season, and you could fit a grapefruit into the hole that was left.  I couldn’t let that little guy suffer anymore.  I took some ribbing from the guys, because I wasted my tag on a mercy kill.  I am sure I could have called the Game Commission and explained the situation, but I made my choice freely and had shot my buck.  While he was not yet gangrene, he was not far from it.  We only kept the hind quarters, and that equated to one meatloaf dinner for our family.  Thus my meatloaf deer was named.

This buck was not the biggest, and definitely not the nicest, but I will always remember this little guy.  I am glad I could be in the right position to help put him out of his misery.  Practice with your weapon at many different yardages.  Know your shot placements for the species you are hunting.  Use a range finder if unsure of how far you shot would be.  And always make ethical shots.





Easter Egg Hunt 2012

2 04 2012

Our grandchildren and Sammy went on a hunt for Easter Eggs, they got a couple. They really enjoyed the hunting, not so much the cleanup. This is not your run of the mill egg hunt tho! The kids have decided that this needs to be part of every Easter.

Sammy, Ginger, Chaney, Sarah and Ryan Easter Egg hunting.





2012 Youth Archery Tournament

26 03 2012

Three of our Grandchildren competed for the first time in an archery tournament this weekend.  To sound like a proud grandma (which I am!), they did WONDERFUL! I was really impressed with all of the kids abilities, and compassion to other kids.  The older ones stepped in to help the little kids, and even the little kids helped with even younger spectators.

Ryan competed in the 7 and 8 year old division.  He had some off moments, but was able to pull out a 225 by the end of the day.  Considering that 300 would be a perfect score, he did great!

Ryan was right on target

Sarah competed in the 9 and 10 year old division.  After some minor adjustments to her sight, she ended the day with a 224. She held it together through the stress of equipment failure.

Sarah loves shooting

Ginger competed in the 11 and 12 year old division, and did fantastic.  She got a new bow just 2 days before the tournament, so a lot of work was needed to get her shooting good.  She shot a 264,  Unfortunately in her division the top 3 shot a 299, 298 and 292.  These kids are good!

Ginger and her new bow

Ginger and her new bow

After the main tournament, the archers shot at balloons, at which Ginger won $1.00 for her team breaking them all the fastest.  Ryan won $9.00 for hitting the X on a javelina target.  Everyone left a winner.

Sarah, Ryan and Ginger





Archery League

11 02 2012

Ryan and Sarah shoot too!

Last night I had the privilege to help with the Youth Archery League at our pro shop.  My grandchildren shoot in this league, but this was the first I had seen these kids in action.  I was impressed!  Even Sarah my 9 year old granddaughter had a perfect 5, 5, 5X round.  These kids can shoot!  I wish I had had this type of opportunity as a child, but since I didn’t, I will make sure my grandchildren do!

My happiness was tempered by a disturbing phone call I received while there.  My father had been rushed to the hospital with a suspected stroke.  He later was rushed to a second hospital for the possibility of doing surgery to relieve the blood on the brain.  I took my sister down to the hospital in time to meet with the Neurosurgeon with my mother.  He stated that Daddy is not a candidate for the surgery and he would recommend that we let nature take it’s course. No extraordinary means are to be implemented to keep my father alive, so it is just a matter of time.  He is being taken back to the nursing home where he has spent the last 2 years, where he has friends and the staff loves him.  I give the staff all the credit in the world, they have a thankless job and have to deal with everything that we are unable to.  I appreciate ALL they do to make life livable for the patients.  THANK YOU!

Today was my regular day to shoot in the Technohunt league.  I kept our time to shoot, simply because I needed to relieve stress and shooting my bow had always been an outlet for me.  Today, I was unable to focus, and coupled with technical difficulties, I did not shoot well at all.  I am not making excuses, it happens.  I am still thankful that I can shoot and can still enjoy life.  I am sure I am in for a rough couple of days/weeks.  I have had rough days and weeks before, it is all part of life.  It just drives home the point to LIVE the life you love.  You never know when that ability will be taken from you.

Love your family, spend time making good memories with them, live your life with no regrets.